Trail Camera Set Up Tips

Trail Camera Set Up Tips

Trail camera technology has come a long way since they were first introduced.

Gone are the days of hanging a string across a deer trail to see what way the deer were traveling. Cameras now have the ability to let hunters download hundreds of pictures directly to their phone from miles away! In this busy world we live in, trail cameras have become an invaluable asset.

If you’re going through the effort of setting up a camera, here are a few things to keep in mind.

Camera Direction:

Nothing is worse than getting a card full of pictures that are blurred out by the sun. This generally happens if your camera is facing directly east or west. If possible, the best way to face your camera is north. You’ll avoid directly facing the sun and also get clearer pictures along the way.

Clear Vegetation:

Similar to sunlight, vegetation near the camera can rack up unusable images. One small stick on a windy afternoon can quickly fill a memory card. You’ll want to focus on clearing vegetation that is in the path of the motion sensor. A rule of thumb is to clear everything that is straight out from the sensor and within a 5-foot diameter of the camera.

Placement Height:

 There are varying schools of thought on how high to place your camera. Some prefer placing higher in a tree angling downward, while others keep them 3-4 feet off the ground. I’ve used my cameras each way and have had success with both methods. However, I’d recommend placing your camera higher and angling downward.

Properly Secured to a Tree: 

Not all trees are created equal or suited well for holding a trail camera. The most common situation I’ve encountered is having a tree that either leans forward or back. A quick fix is placing a stick behind the camera to ensure it is pointed the right direction. If you go this route, be sure the stick is secured tightly behind the camera so it will not adjust after you leave.

Trail cameras can be a great addition to your scouting efforts and provide great opportunities for viewing wildlife. Whatever your purpose, make sure you set yourself up for success by placing them in a way to capture great photos!


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